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I’m Geena Matuson,
arts technologist, educator,
author and speaker.

A multimedia storyteller, I use print, digital, web, video and social to tell cohesive stories that prioritize relationships.

Anas Almaletti finds scalable concepts

Anas Almaletti finds scalable concepts

Anas Almaletti (at center) with team at the Cricket Wireless in Western Light Plaza, 2019.

“Just because you’re good at something doesn’t mean you’re passionate about it,” said Anas Almaletti, CEO of Cell Phones for Less.

Anas stated that delegation is important, and finding a scalable concept is key. Hearing a successful entrepreneur give real life examples of these keywords helped me relate these points to my own work. Anas started in his father’s phone repair shop, and soon looked to Cricket Wireless chains to create a scalable business.

I’m finding the business I’d like to launch is more scalable with its web and graphic design component, which I had previously sidelined. Focus on scaling the area of the business that will make the business sustainable, and invest profit into another area of the business you’d like to create.

Similarly, Anas noted he’s still interested in the phone repairs business, but has trouble with integration. In Alen Puaca’s article “Future Trends in Wireless Retail” on iQmetrix, the idea of in-store, in-person repairs is noted as part of the trend in growing B2C interactions we’re all learning towards. Floorplan, the flow of a store and its product placement, impact its products. I wonder if Anas sees proof or effects of this trend on his repair business, or if he’ll test varied placement for repair counters in his store. This consideration may come late to Anas; it can be largely linked to the store’s design and displays for which he relies on Cricket Wireless’ design team.

While store interiors are left to Cricket, Anas does a great job evaluating new store locations. Accessibility and visibility are both key, in addition to demographic and competition considerations, he states.

I’ve found a recurring theme among entrepreneurs: many have the ability to speak about their product, but few have translated this into a web-accessible format. For instance, I know a local business owner who sells clothing online and complains he gets little foot traffic in his brick and mortar location. Just the other day, I realized the store’s location is not listed on his website. Such can be said about Anas’ website, which is years outdated. His businesses are clearly thriving as he moves into expansion over the next 12 months, but he acknowledged this outdated website deters potential customers.

Anas’ presentation was a great example of the types of slide decks everyone should make; they highlight key points on which we can expand to fit time needs or constraints in any setting. (Plus, no one can steal your content when the bulk must be spoken aloud, onsite.)

His largest piece of advice? To be compassionate to both yourself and others.

People can lose sight of the humanity in a business, and his consideration of others’ feelings, thoughts and needs is why Anas has such a positive and thriving internal structure. The fact he also reinvests all earnings from his companies into additional businesses due to the needs of others, as he explained, compounds the idea that he puts his people first. Speaking to another student after Anas’ presentation, we agreed we both felt inspired.

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